VentWorld
LTV 950 Gel Cell Battery

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http://ventworld.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/8706082361/m/4501069421

April 02, 2005, 04:09 PM
josepht
LTV 950 Gel Cell Battery
Hello, all! This is my first post here.

I am a new trach/vent patient (as of 6/2/04), and I have a question. I use a LTV 950 from Pulmonetics, and I am looking for a dry or gel cell battery to use during commercial flights. Knowing nothing about batteries, do any of you have any recommendations for good dry or gel cell batteries with at least a 16 hour life?

Thanks!

Joseph
August 16, 2005, 10:05 AM
<J>
It is only reccomended to use Pulmonetic batteries.
August 23, 2005, 11:30 AM
<Charlievents>
Hello Joseph:

Have you seen Pulmonetics small travel batteries (very small - the size of a paperback book? They last 3 hours each & I borrowed them from Pulmonetics to go to Japan in June 2004. For the story and pictures
(See http://www.pulmonetic.com/quality_of_life/audrey_king.aspx?202624375
August 24, 2005, 04:18 PM
josepht
Thank you so much, Aurdey! I just recently stumbled on to the page about the lithium ion battery from Pulmonetic. I e-mailed them for more information, but I've not received a reply. I am going to call my equipment provider soon to see if I can borrow two batteries.

May I have your e-mail address? (Mine is jbtodd2@gmail.com .) I would love for us to correspond. As a new vent patient who is interested in living on a vent, not being on a vent, I think I could learn a lot from you.
August 31, 2005, 06:24 PM
<Charlievents>
Hi Joseph:

My e-mail is king.aj@rogers.com

Write to me anytime.
P.S. "Charlie" is my cat - hence "charlievents!!"
October 26, 2006, 05:44 PM
<preferred homecare>
you can use a battery from MK Called U-1
part number MU-1 SLD G their phone # is
1-800-372-9253
October 28, 2006, 07:54 AM
<Dave Tolle (RRT, RCP) ret>
Portable ventilators are designed to be able to meet some high workoads if needed. Users with more normal lungs use less power than those with stiff lungs or higher minute volumes. Each vent will have a DC circuit breaker rated in amps. That value is the highest DC current draw allowed for that unit before the safety breaker trips. On some vents you can measure the DC amp used in a particular patients case by placing an ameter (multimeter, digital or analogue) in line while a battery is in use. The power draw will vary being nominal during exhalation and maximal at peak pressure. With a little math you will derive the average amp draw for that utilization. Deep cycle batteries are all rated in amp hours. Divide the average amp requirement of the patient into the amp hour rating of the battery and you'll get hours of available use time on a fully charged battery. This will give some guidelines for battery use periods,etc.... There should always be a wide safety margin of power or additional DC sources available if need requires. Also solar panels put out DC power and can be used to recharge batteries or directly supply DC power to ventilators as long as the power output ratings are within user needs and maximum safety (actually what you do is put batteries in-line with them to act as big capacitors).
August 29, 2014, 11:33 AM
Albert Burg
quote:
Originally posted by Dave Tolle (RRT, RCP) ret:
Portable ventilators are designed to be able to meet some high workoads if needed. Users with more normal lungs use less power than those with stiff lungs or higher minute volumes. Each vent will have a DC circuit breaker rated in amps. That value is the highest DC current draw allowed for that unit before the safety breaker trips. On some vents you can measure the DC amp used in a particular patients case by placing an ameter (multimeter, digital or analogue) in line while a battery is in use. The power draw will vary being nominal during exhalation and maximal at peak pressure. With a little math you will derive the average amp draw for that utilization. Deep cycle batteries are all rated in amp hours. Divide the average amp requirement of the patient into the amp hour rating of the battery and you'll get hours of available use time on a fully charged battery. This will give some guidelines for battery use periods,etc.... There should always be a wide safety margin of power or additional DC sources available if need requires. Also solar panel put out DC power and can be used to recharge batteries or directly supply DC power to ventilators as long as the power output ratings are within user needs and maximum safety (actually what you do is put batteries in-line with them to act as big capacitors).

I think portable ventilator is a better option if you have huge electricity demand but we can opt for solar energy if plenty of sunshine is available and we have less electricity demand..

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Albert Burg,